Archive for the ‘behind the candelabra’ Tag

65th Primetime Emmys: Outstanding Miniseries or Movie   Leave a comment

movie miniseries

 

PAST PREDICTIONS:

2005: Warm Springs[CORRECT] and “Empire Falls[WRONG]
2006:
The Girl in the Cafe[CORRECT] and “Elizabeth I[CORRECT]
2007:
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee[CORRECT] and “Prime Suspect: Final Act[WRONG]
2008:
Recount[CORRECT] and “John Adams[CORRECT]
2009:
Grey Gardens[CORRECT] and “Generation Kill[WRONG]
2010:
You Don’t Know Jack[WRONG] and “The Pacific[CORRECT]
2011:
Downton Abbey[CORRECT]
2012:
Game Change” [CORRECT]

Now that we’re done with the three acting categories here (Haven’t made up my mind yet on who’ll win Lead Actress), it’s time to move on with the main program award by discussing the Best Movie or Miniseries category. It’s almost a moot to even tackle each category comprehensively, as there seems to be a clear winner here already. The Steven Soderbergh directed film Behind the Candelabra is obviously winning the top prize. With great reviews, a historic Cannes competition participation, and overwhelming reception, this is one of the easier to predict wins for the night. The closest runner-up I can come up with is Sundance Channel’s Top of the Lake which also received unanimously great reviews and probably the little contender that could.

As for the others, despite American Horror Story: Asylum dominating the nominations with a whooping 17(!) nods and topping all the other programs this year, it will clearly follow the path of its predecessor last year safely winning an acting award (or two). The mere fact that it continues to dominate the noms yet it can’t break through the directing AND writing categories speaks volumes about its actual support in the Academy. Phil Spector is the typical HBO filler category year like what Hemingway & Gellhorn was last year and You Don’t Know Jack was the year before. It contains two movie stars in lead roles, but doesn’t really have anything else in its corner.

After History’s history breaking ratings with Hatfields & McCoys last year, they continue to beat their own record in terms of ratings for miniseries, with The Bible this year. Sadly for them, the nomination for their achievement is their main reward seeing that it only got in two other categories. As for Political Animals, you can use the same analogy to Phil Spector, only replace HBO with USA.

As I’ve mentioned, it will be an easy win for Behind the Candelabra, and may I say deservedly so? J

Prediction: Behind the Candelabra
Runner-Up: Top of the Lake

Full Rankings:
1. “Behind the Candelabra
2. “Top of the Lake
3. “American Horror Story: Asylum
4. “Phil Spector
5. “Political Animals
6. “The Bible

If you want, you can follow me on Twitter: @nikowl

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65th Primetime Emmys: Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie   Leave a comment

supp actor miniseries

PAST PREDICTIONS:

2005: Paul Newman, “Empire Falls[CORRECT]
2006:
Jeremy Irons, “Elizabeth I[CORRECT]
2007:
Thomas Haden Church, “Broken Trail[CORRECT]
2008:
Tom Wilkinson, “John Adams[CORRECT]
2009:
Tom Courtenay, “Little Dorrit[WRONG]
2010:
David Strathairn, “Temple Grandin[CORRECT]
2011:
Guy Pearce, “Mildred Pierce[CORRECT]
2012:
Ed Harris, “Game Change” [WRONG]

Hi, you are still following my 2013 Emmy coverage, and I’m in the middle of doing my Emmy predictions for this year (you can check lead actor in a miniseries  and supporting actress in a miniseries). Now it’s time to move the spotlight to the supporting actors of the past year’s miniseries TV movies and miniseries. This is a fairly good bunch of nominees, with John Benjamin Hickey being a pleasant surprise nominee, and with supposed to be 2x Emmy nominee this year (but ended up with 0 nods in total) Jeffrey Tambor for Phil Spector.

This year, we get two actors from American Horror Story: Asylum nominated here. Oscar nominee James Cromwell is up for his turn as the asylum doctor. This is such a departure from his most prominent perceived work in Babe: Pig in the City. Alongside him is movie star Zachary Quinto who already won the Critics Choice TV Award in this category for his performance in the same show. Between this and his summer movie Star Trek, Quinto has the advantage over his co-star.

If there’s one actor who I possibly thought has a shot in getting nominated here for The Big C: Hereafter, it’s three time Emmy nominee Oliver Platt. That’s why I’m surprised (and a great one at that) that it ended up with John Benjamin Hickey getting the nod instead. As the unique and standout brother of Cathy Jameson, Hickey’s performance is very noticeable and easy to warm up to, and it can work in his favor among voters in this category.

Peter Mullan is not a household name in the United States though many here have already heard him before in his previous roles in other Jane Campion production. In Top of the Lake, he takes a role that I can call as a vital supporting one. Think of John Hawkes in Winter’s Bone or Dwight Henry in Beasts of the Southern Wild. With a female lead in tow, he gets the biggest male role and it’s usually one that gets awards. However, with his close to unknown status, I don’t know if Emmys will reward him with the win.

Lastly, there’s Scott Bakula. At first, it’s really surprising how he ended up being the lone supporting actor rewarded with a nomination for Behind the Candelabra (as opposed to more predicted co-stars Rob Lowe and Dan Aykroyd). But one does need to know that he was elected an important position among the Screen Actors Guild just this year, and that usually translates well with Emmy voters. His performance in the Soderbergh directed drama is okay, and if he manages to win, it’s not even the worst among past winning performances here in this category.

With no solid frontrunner in this category, the Emmy could actually go to any of the five nominees. With that said I’ll probably go the safe route and predict the SAG chairperson for the win. This somehow reminded me of the same category in 2009 with then SAG president Ken Howard winning despite not a stand out role for Grey Gardens. I’m using the same argument here in predicting Scott Bakula for the win. If not him, then the buzz for Zachary Quinto might end up with an Emmy win alongside his TV CCA win.

Prediction: Scott Bakula, “Behind the Candelabra
Runner-Up: Zachary Quinto, “American Horror Story: Asylum

Full Rankings:
1. Scott Bakula, “Behind the Candelabra
2. Zachary Quinto, “American Horror Story: Asylum
3. John Benjamin Hickey, “The Big C: Hereafter
4. Peter Mullan, “Top of the Lake
5. James Cromwell, “American Horror Story: Asylum

As always, you can follow me on Twitter: @nikowl

65th Primetime Emmys: Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie   Leave a comment

actor miniseries

It’s Emmy season!

Over the next few weeks, I’ll be posting my Emmy predictions in 23 different categories before we head on the actual ceremonies on September 22. And as always, we’ll tackle one category at a time, and this year will begin with Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie.

PAST PREDICTIONS:

2005: Geoffrey Rush, “The Life and Death of Peter Sellers[CORRECT]
2006:
Donald Sutherland, “Human Trafficking[WRONG]
2007:
Robert Duvall, “Broken Trail[CORRECT]
2008:
Paul Giammatti “John Adams[CORRECT]
2009:
Kevin Bacon, “Taking Chance[WRONG]
2010:
Al Pacino, “You Don’t Know Jack[CORRECT]
2011:
Edgar Ramirez, “Carlos[WRONG]
2012:
Kevin Costner, “Hatfields & McCoys” [CORRECT]

If there’s any indication that HBO dominates the Emmys, one does not need to look any further, as this category’s nominees were all from HBO produced films. Let’s start the discussion with the Cannes entry Behind the Candelabra. Playing renowned pianist Liberace, five time Emmy nominee Michael Douglas gets career best reviews for his physical transformation as the gay musician. With the rate of these reviews are going, it’s pretty easy to say he’s the frontrunner in this category. However, most of his screentime is shared with co-nominee and co-star Matt Damon who played Liberace’s lover Scott Thorson. While both are co-leads in the film, it’s easier to see that Douglas is the main star of the show and has the advantage over Damon.

As for Parade’s End‘s Benedict Cumberbatch, he’s the obvious weak link in this group, and his nod rooted from his movie star success of Star Trek during the nomination period. It must be noted though that this is his second consecutive nomination here, as he’s also nominated for Sherlock this year, so if there’s some left over love for that, then he can possible score more votes. Isn’t it unfair that Toby Jones always has to go for the lesser buzzed versions when he plays real life people such as his Capote performance in Infamous being released shortly after Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Oscar winning performance of the same character? The same can be applied again as his role as Alfred Hitchcock in The Girl has to contend in TV movies when the feature film Hitchcock was just released last year. Anyway, Jones was Hitchcock personified in his performance, but the total lack of interest over the TV movie definitely speaks about his chances.

Then there’s Al Pacino. Pacino is 2/2 in this category winning the first time for Angels in America in 2004 and then again for You Don’t Know Jack in 2010. For Phil Spector, he donned in the wigs and transformed into the main character and was given lots of baity scenes to work on. Plus they showered the TV movie with a lot of nominations as well.  If voters are not fond of Behind the Candelabra, I can see them going for Pacino.

With that said, I still think that it’s Michael Douglas’ to lose. He’s a five time Emmy nominee who hasn’t won any Emmy yet (and his first nomination was 39 years ago) while getting career best reviews for this performance. He also gets to play a “challenging” role which involved lots of physical transformations in it. If not him, you can count Matt Damon to win his first Emmy though. Either way, Behind the Candelabra will score a win in this category.

Prediction: Michael Douglas, “Behind the Candelabra
Runner-Up: Matt Damon, “Behind the Candelabra

Final Rankings:
1. Michael Douglas, “Behind the Candelabra
2. Matt Damon, “Behind the Candelabra
3. Al Pacino, “Phil Spector
4. Toby Jones, “The Girl
5. Benedict Cumberbatch, “Parade’s End

You can follow me on Twitter: @nikowl

66th Cannes Film Festival Winner Predictions   1 comment

 

Photo courtesy of  Zimbio

In just a few hours, the 66th Cannes Film Festival is about to close. After almost two weeks of non-stop film premieres, the biggest movie festival in the world will soon end. And it is up to jury head Steven Spielberg, together with members Nicole Kidman, Ang Lee, Christoph Waltz, Lynne Ramsay, Naomi Kawase, Cristian Mungiu, Daniel Auteuil, and Vidya Balan, to reveal their choices on the winning films and performances for this year. It’s definitely one of those up in the air years, as there were a lot of films that gained positive response from the media and the Cannes audience this year. And of course, there’s also those surprising choices that came from movies that received cold reception.

I’ll give my shot on who I think will end up as winners in the festival this year. However, it is noteworthy to emphasize that it is really difficult to predict these things since there’s no trend to follow as the jury members change every year. But with that said, here are my predictions for the seven categories to be awarded at the closing festivities:

SCREENPLAY:

Prediction: Ethan and Joel Coen, “Inside Llewyn Davis
As of now, the Coens’ latest entry is turning up to be the best reviewed American film of the year thus far (with a perfect 100 score), and Llewyn seems to be destined to win something in the festival. While chances of directing, actor for Oscar Isaac, and even the Palme d’Or (critics are comparing it to Barton Fink which won them a Director prize), I think they will spread the wealth and reward it with a Screenplay win.

Alternate: Asghar Farhadi, “Le Passé
Farhadi is shaping out to be one of the notable names in festivals and his follow up to 2011’s A Separation also gained notable mentions from the critics. If Farhadi won’t win the top plum this year, then they can pick up multiple wins including this one for screenplay.

ACTOR:

PREDICTION: Michael Douglas and Matt Damon, “Behind the Candelabra
While odds for a tie are slim, I’m predicting the team up of Matt Damon and Michael Douglas to pick up the top male plum for this year. It really sucks that this won’t get a theater premiere (which easily eliminates them from Oscar contention), but Douglas’ unanimous reviews (and even mentions of his all time best work) is definitely a shoo-in for an Emmy already. It’s also likely that it will solely be Douglas who will win, but with Damon working with Spielberg in the past, he can easily sneak Damon for the win too.

ALTERNATE: Bruce Dern, “Nebraska
If not Douglas, then one can expect Bruce Dern to snatch up the Actor prize for his work in Alexander Payne’s Nebraska. This can be some sort of a prelude to his possible Oscar season, and they can also tag team Will Forte as well, in case they give Behind the Candelabra a higher award.

ACTRESS:

PREDICTION: Adèle Exarchopoulos, “Blue is the Warmest Color
If the jury doesn’t connect to a consensus choice of Blue… being the Palme d’Or, then it can find its way to recognition by winning the Actress award via Adèle Exarchopoulos’s unanimously praised performance. If the Damon/Douglas tie don’t work in Actor, then expect a consecutive tie here (after last year’s victory from Beyond the Hills ladies) between Adèle Exarchopoulos and co-star Lea Seydoux.

ALTERNATE: Marion Cotillard, “The Immigrant
After failing to win this category last year for Rust and Bone, Cotillard can see herself in contention and even a win for this year, thanks to James Gray’s The Immigrant. Cotillard is a famous French star who has been a regular at Cannes for the past few years. This can also be The Immigrant’s win especially if the movie divides the jury.

DIRECTOR:

PREDICTION:  Paolo Sorrentino, “La Grande Belleza
Sorrentino surprised everyone when he got overwhelming positive response for this year’s The Great Beauty. Reviews specify the good combination of breathtaking visuals and the strong direction, which leads me to believe that if Sorrentino wins anything from the festival, it’ll most be likely this one.

ALTERNATE: Steven Soderbergh, “Behind the Candelabra
Soderbergh is one of the true Cannes breakouts. His career started out with sex.lies.videotape in 1989, and this could be a statement from the jury for Hollywood passing up on the film because of its theme. Also, Soderbergh hasn’t won in this category yet, and this can be his first prize here.

JURY PRIZE

PREDICTION: Hirakazu Kore-eda, “Like Father, Like Son
Kore-eda’s drama about the nature vs. nurture of two children switched at birth was a hit at Cannes, and Jury Prize seems to be the most fitting category to reward it. Rumor also have it that Kore-eda is already back at Cannes, which means that it’s likely that the film will be rewarded for something. It also seemed to be getting raves from the jury with Spielberg quoted as emotional to the film’s theme.

ALTERNATE: James Gray, “The Immigrant
Gray is such a divisive filmmaker. His works is always between a love it or you hate it. It’s either for you or not. With that said, I can also see a scenario where they give him the Jury Prize in order to satisfy members of Jury who wants it to be rewarded with something while also satisfying those members who do not like it, as it won’t get the top prize.

GRAND PRIX:

PREDICTION: Jia Zhangke, “A Touch of Sin
Jia Zhangke’s A Touch of Sin seems to be perfect for the Grand Prix category. It’s not a total standout to win the Palme, but it gains specific supporters that can push it for this. He was also spotted already back in Cannes, and he’ll probably get something tomorrow.

ALTERNATE: Abdellatif Kechiche, “Blue is the Warmest Color
I can see this following the scenario of The Master over at Venice last year. It’s the unanimously praise film that gets the jury pumped up. But since the top prize can’t win anything else, they’d have to settle giving the runner up prize to it in order to accommodate other noteworthy things about the film such as rewarding the lead actresses. It can be a battle between giving a sole top prize or settling for second with multiple mentions to go home.

PALME D’OR:

PREDICTION: Asghar Farhadi, “The Past
And I guess the top prize will be given to Farhadi’s The Past. It’s French, it has Farhadi, it’s the conventional choice, it made jury member Kidman in tears after leaving the screening. The Past seems to be the logical choice that will not be hated; after all, it got solid reviews, it’s not as particularly polarizing from the other commendable entries, and you know everyone is just in love with Asghar Farhadi right now. While this is no sure thing, I can see this getting the consensus pick among the jury members.

ALTERNATE: Abdellatif Kechiche, “Blue is the Warmest Color
Lo and behold, this is really the film that towered among everyone else in terms of critical reception. It has already gained buzz and world interest, and the reviews are really staggering and far and away from the other contenders. The thing though that makes it an easy choice to win is that the theme might alienate others. We still don’t know for sure what type of jury is this, and we don’t know if they’re really gonna go for something as bold as this to receive the top prize. But as always, it can easily snoop in the top prize if it gets the jury fired up.

That’s it. I’m really excited to see a lot of entries from this year’s batch, as it’s one of the most lauded in years. I’m also gonna miss Legend Kidman’s red carpet appearances and teaching everyone how it’s done. I’m looking forward to the closing and awarding ceremonies later. Now, who are you rooting and predicting to win? Post it there in the Comments section.

You can follow me on Twitter: @nikowl