Archive for the ‘derek ramsey’ Tag

2012: The Year in Lead Actors   1 comment

2012 lead actors

Hey everyone! We’re still continuing the yearend lists over here at Tit for Tat. Aside from that, we’re also doing the recap of the movie performances in local cinema the past year. The past two days, we gave the focus to the supporting actresses and supporting actors. It’s time to move now to the leading categories. For this day, we’d give the spotlight to the men and tackle the Best Actor category. Like what I said, these are possible choices from all the award giving bodies this year from mainstream to indie and those that can cross-over in between. Let’s begin!

LEADERS OF THE PACK

Probably the strongest contender in this category for this year is acting legend Eddie Garcia as he adds another memorable turn for his role as the old gay man living with his dog in Bwakaw. His competition this year might skew to much younger actors though as there have been lots of good awards-bait performances this year such as the likes of Dingdong Dantes‘ MMFF winning performance in One More Try, Coco Martin‘s indie comeback as the father who found the remains of his daughter in Santa Nina, Jericho Rosales as the single parent whose son gone missing in Alagwa, and JM de Guzman as the mussel diver in the title role Intoy Syokoy ng Kalye Marino.

MIDDLE TIER

As for the other lead roles in contention, award giving bodies might also throw a bone to Arnold Reyes as the loyal driver who was caught in the middle in his Congressman employer in the Tribeca hit Graeland, awards staple John Lloyd Cruz might get some nominations as well for his performance opposite Bea Alonzo in The Mistress or for his movie with Angel Locsin, Unofficially Yours.  Scene stealing Archie Alemania should hear his name be read especially at the Comedy Best Actor of the Golden Screen Awards for his role in Cinema One Original entry Slumber Party. And in a surprising turn of events, we’d have a battle of two heroes this year in the Best Actor category: Alfred Vargas as Andres Bonifacio in Richard Somes’ Supremo and ER Ejercito as Emilio Aguinaldo in the MMFF entry El Presidente.

Cinemalaya movies also produced a lot of worthy Best Actor turns such as the winning performance of Kristoffer King in Oros, Pen Medina in Kamera Obskura, Dominic Roco‘s Gibson in Ang Nawawala, and Thai actor playing lone soldier Ananda Everingham in Kalayaan. Casting issues (from Cinemalaya) aside, Allan Paule‘s fantastic turn in Emerson Reyes’s MNL 143 can possibly reap nominations as well.

THE REST OF THE RACE

Other lead actor contenders that might are still in the race are Dennis Trillo in the title role of Ang Katiwala, Cinema One Originals Best Actor winner Alex Medina in Palitan, newbie actor Gerry Adeva as the title role in Mamay Umeng, Allen Dizon in Joel Lamangan’s drama Migrante, and the most intelligent and uptight of the three gay friends Markki Stroem in Slumber Party. Among mainstream movies, one can also consider Derek Ramsey in A Secret Affair, Aga Muhlach in Of All The Things, Piolo Pascual in Every Breath U Take, Enchong Dee in The Strangers, and Vice Ganda in either This Guy’s in Love With U Mare or Sisterakas.

That’s it. Last part of the acting spotlight tomorrow with everybody’s favorite category: Best Actress!

As always, you can follow me on Twitter: @nikowl

REVIEW: A Secret Affair   9 comments

Mistress themed movies are the new bread and butter to become a staple hit nowadays, so everyone wants to star in one. Whether it’s the society’s penchant for seeing two women fight, hear endless quotable lines, or simply the gossip mongers nature of the people in our country, they’ve become a tradition now to expose affairs in the big screen, at least. The latest to join the bandwagon is the triumvirate of Anne Curtis, Derek Ramsay, and Andi Eigenmann under the helm of TV director Nuel Naval in his first movie offering entitled  A Secret Affair.

Raffy (Anne Curtis) and Anton (Derek Ramsay) have been in a relationship for just three months, but he already popped the question to her. While she said yes, she gets cold feet the night before the actual wedding causing them to call the event off. Raffy went abroad to think about it, while Anton is left here devastated. Raffy’s sorority sister, Sam (Andi Eigennman), has the hots for him and tried her best to take her place, sexually at least. So when Raffy re-entered the picture, chaos ensues among the three.

To start things off, the storytelling seems straight out of the telenovela handbook. Characters leaving no room for logic at all and women snapping at each other. The friends of the other two women switch from one camp to the other, while Raffy switches from a petty bitch at one scene to a helpless crier on the next one. Sam’s too one note of a character that when she feels hurt, you can’t help but laugh at her. It seems as if there’s no big rationale behind their actions but just to play cat and mice with each other trying to have the last laugh.

As if that’s not enough, the dialogue was cringe-worthy. I admit there were those parts that worked with me dialogue wise, but it was an overkill. Normal people do not speak this way, and it occurs as if the writers are attempting to come up with a quotable line that will serve as a catch phrase in the long run, so they inserted all their entries in the film and relies on which one will work (For the record, my favorite is Raffy’s delivery of “Alam mo saan masarap mag-kape? Sa burol mo.“). The rest were just simply cheap pot shots that reflect how poorly the characters were written. The biggest laugh though comes in the end, when we’re treated to a “reflection” part of the three characters of what they’ve learned from it. Ahhhhh! Last shot to justify the relevance of the film.

For what it’s worth, I appreciate Nuel Naval’s direction. There were some scenes that showed some potential. I’ve been a fan of his Maalaala Mo Kaya episodes, and I know that he can do better given a tighter and better material to work on. As for the acting, Anne Curtis has already amassed this likable persona that you would be rooting for her either way even if she’s the mistress (see: No Other Woman) or this time, the protagonist. But having a likable personality can only bring you so far especially if you’re given a poorly written character to play. The same can be said for Andi Eigenmann who definitely has made her presence felt but can’t escape from the one note character that she was given too. Derek Ramsay was thankless as usual, though I guess one puts too much effort given that body he shed off in the film. Jaclyn Jose was the only remarkable among the supporting players, but even she is a hit or miss.

The way I see it, the film’s biggest problem is its material. For a movie that tends to borrow all the tips from the telenovela handbook, it tried to push a “realistic” (re: moral) ending. I’m pretty sure that many people from this production can do better than this; it’s just that there’s no one who rose above the helpless material they were given.

Grade: 2/5

REVIEW: No Other Woman   3 comments

“Ang mundo ay isang malaking Quiapo, maraming snatcher.”

Is September the official cheating month? After My Neighbor’s Wife last week, Star Cinema gives their obligatory infidelity drama of the year. This time, it’s Derek Ramsey and Cristine Reyes who plays husband and wife, only to be disturbed big time by Anne Curtis. Ram (Ramsey), a furniture designer,  is married to Sharmaine (Reyes) whose father still does not approve of him even if they are already married for years. He was contacted to be the supplier of a new high posh resort owned by the dad of Cara (Curtis).  What happened enxt is a whirlwind romance that featured a lot of kissing, name-calling, and even an act of poisoning.

The story was set up very nicely. It did not try to add some twist with regards to the storytelling and just presented the story directly. Like in any Star Cinema film, the lead characters always have a problem with any of the member of the family (this time, it’s the father) which served as the B plot back story on why the characters act in such manner. Fortunately, it worked here since the small plots served as real back stories that did not sound forced nor contrived. What I like about the film is that no one claims to be a saint. Everyone knows what they’re doing and that they’re just taking advantage of the situation given to them. The location of the film does look too posh (and costly), and it gave the director and the cinematographer some opportunities for very nice shots, which they took advantage.

Of course, people are gonna be raving about the lines. Oh boy, the audience is really receptive every time Carmi Martin throws her lines. The whole crowd is going crazy. Additionally, it’s the subtle hints that both Anne and Cristine give to each other that will end up in all local movie confrontation lists. In relation to that, the real star of the show is the cast. Derek Ramsey was physically (and emotionally) fit to play the role of Ram. Cristine Reyes was a bit hammy in her supposedly “shining moments” and the audience isn’t sympathizing with her. But she played the role good enough that it didn’t ruin my movie watching experience. Ultimately, it was the Anne Curtis movie. Everything about her screams the role she’s playing. This is an all time best performance from her, and I doubt she’ll be able to top this.

ALSO: The scene where both Cristine and Anne are in their bikinis beside the pool is already worth the admission price!

This is nowhere the best film of all time lists but for the camp factor alone, I’m sure you’ll enjoy this. Everyone will love to watch all the confrontation scenes over and over again. Plus, It’s Anne and Cristine in bikinis! Oh, and the story too. 🙂

Grade: B+

Posted September 29, 2011 by Nicol Latayan in Films, Reviews

Tagged with , , , ,