Archive for the ‘john lapuz’ Tag

REVIEW: Si Agimat, Si Enteng, At Si Ako   6 comments

agimat enteng ako

Si Agimat at si Enteng Kabisote is probably one of the most overstaying franchise in Metro Manila Film festival history. Enteng Kabisote is now on its seventh outing, while Agimat is now on its third. Its stars Bong Revilla and Vic Sotto has been festival mainstays for a long time now. This is Vic’s eleventh consecutive entry and Bong’s eighth since 1999. The two already previously collaborated on the first Agimat and Enteng two years ago. I really don’t know why I’m giving you all these details, but just so you know, they’re collaborating again this year with an additional companion via Judy Ann Santos in Tony Reyes’s Si Agimat si Enteng, at si AKO.

When they’re not busy fighting off monsters, Agimat (Revilla) finally married long time girlfriend Samara (Sam Pinto). This means that pal Enteng (Vic Sotto) together with his wife Faye (Gwen Zamora) and the rest of the Kabisote gang is also invited. The third person in the crowd is environmentalist Angelina Kalinisan Orteza a.k.a AKO. When technologically savaged monsters are off to conquer the world, it is up to this trio to save the world and call it a day.

Most of the first part of the movie was focused on introducing the three characters. We get to see how it was for Agimat and for Enteng and their respective partners. It was also an introduction for AKO’s character. From there, everything else went down. Now we got a boatload of product placements. Mind you, they’re not just simple product insertion in the background, but actual dialogues containing their individual endorsements. That was probably the movie’s lowest moment. But everyone else was annoying. The storyline with wives getting jealous to Ako was disastrous and annoying. I was thisclose to championing Ako to flirt with both Enteng and Agimat, but then I remembered this is not a mistress movie. Possible sequel next year perhaps?

If anything, there’s not much to look forward to actually. I enjoyed Judy Ann Santos stint as Ako, though it was somewhat obvious that this is just a one time commitment. The three leads have chemistry, and I enjoyed their group hug running joke. The movie tried to fit in everything that they can just to say it’s a family friendly movie by including shallow portrayals of taking care of the environment or an overacting Aiza Seguerra in a group prayer scene. Some technical achievements were also commendable such as the make up and shots of the gorgeous Ilocos Norte.

But amidst all this, these questions still remain: Is this really necessary? Would something have changed if the movie was not made? What can it still offer to its readers? And lastly, when will it end?

Grade: 1.5/5

Here are the reviews of the other Metro Manila Film Festival 2012 entries:

El Presidente
One More Try
Shake, Rattle, and Roll 14: The Invasion
Sisterakas
Sosy Problems
The Strangers
Thy Womb

You can follow me on Twitter: @nikowl

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8th Cinemalaya Film Festival Review: Part 3   8 comments

Hi everyone! How’s your weekend? In case you have no idea how to spend today and tomorrow, I’ll suggest you head over at the CCP (or even Glorietta and Trinoma) to catch the movies of Cinemalaya 2012 for this year. They’re worth the admission price that you”ll pay. In line with that, this part will cover the next four movie reviews of films from this year’s edition.

As a guide, here is the first part of my review covering Mga Mumunting Lihim, Kamera Obskura, Intoy Syokoy ng Kalye Marino, and Kalayaan. The second part is this one and covers The Animals, Bwakaw, Mga Dayo, and Ang Nawawala.

OROS
Director: Paul Sta. Ana
Starring: Kristoffer King, Kristoffer Martin, Tanya Gomez
Competition: New Breed

This one gives viewers a look on the business of buying claimed bodies and holding wakes in order to gain more money via different means of gambling specifically sakla and tongits.

Oros gives a pretty accurate and specific portrayal of the topic that it covered, though I can’t help but notice that it tends to go overboard with its poverty porn treatment. For what its worth though, there’s a lot of discovery that one learns while watching the film. Ending is pretty much a give away though; thus, it lessened the actual impact that it was hoping to achieve. Kristoffer King gave a very competent leading performance, while Kristoffer Martin was a surprise as King’s younger brother. I’m not a fan of the shaky camera, but the movie is still serviceable with some commendable highlights in it.

Rating: 3 / 5

REquieme!
Director: Loy Arcenas
Starring: Shamaine Centenera Buencamino, Rez Cortez, Anthony Falcon
Competition: New Breed

REquieme tells somewhat related stories involving a funeral: the first one deals with a barangay captain (Centenera) who wants to bring home the body of a claimed distant relative who is a suspect in the killing of a famous world designer. The second one is about Joanna (Tolentino) who gives a neighbor, who served as his father figure, a deserving funeral. In between this, there’s also a story of a body that can’t seem to find its way home.

This one comes off as a surprise for me, as I certainly loved every minute of it. While the hilarious moments are indeed tummy aching, I find it more as an inspired avenue to tackle, highlight and realize Filipino characteristics especially those that involves connecting one’s name to fame. Anchored by the great Shamaine Centenera Buencamino (who’s 2 for 2 now in terms of giving memorable Cinemalaya performances after last year’s Nino), and a breakout performance by Anthony Falcon (who steals every scene he’s in), REquieme is one of those movies in this batch that definitely stood out.

Rating: 4.5 /5

SANTA NIÑA
Director: Emmanuel Palo
Starring: Coco Martin, Alessandra de Rossi, Anita Linda, Irma Adlawan
Competition: New Breed

When Paulino (Martin) discovered that the remains of his two year old daughter Marikit did not even decay a bit, this led to the questions of one’s faith and unraveling of secrets that were kept too long already.

It is difficult to tackle themes of faith in Filipino movies especially since there’s this one movie called Himala that set the bar too high for others to follow suit. However, Santa Nina does a good job in covering the said theme while adding layers of family drama and secrets of the past in the mix. The shots and technical aspects were very commendable; I specifically like the palette that they used in the movie. Coco Martin was serviceable in his job, though signs of too much television drama appear every now and then. His chemistry with Alessandra de Rossi is very natural though. Anita Linda and Irma Adlawan both have vital roles that managed to stand on their own during some parts of the movie.I felt that the movie was some minutes longer, and it could have ended on a different manner, but this one possesses good merits in it for me not to appreciate the film as a whole.

Rating: 4/ 5

POSAS
Director: Lawrence Fajardo
Starring: Nico Antonio, Art Acuña, Bangs Garcia, Jake Macapagal
Competition: New Breed

A day in the life of a thief as we get to see a blow by blow account of what happens once he gets under the fingers of police authority.

I feel this one has a been-there-done-that feeling, as the first film that comes to mind was Brillante Mendoza’s Kinatay. Both movies follow one momentous day in the life of the main character when he gets under a circumstance that he doesn’t want to be into, and he faces the consequences of the said situation. Having said that, this one (like Oros) gives a specific and detailed portrayal of the topic that it wants to cover. The saving grace of the film was Acuña’s terrific acting as the head police officer, and John Lapuz’s storyline as another victim, but it lacks the impact that will make the movie memorable enough once the credits roll.

Rating: 2.5 / 5

12 down, 3 more left. Last batch contains the last three movies left in the festival (Aparisyon, Diablo, and Ang Katiwala). Also, don’t forget to follow me on Twitter: @nikowl