Archive for the ‘Kasal Kasali Kasalo’ Tag

Tit for Tat Local Film Awards: Screenplay Winners 2000-2014   Leave a comment

So I’ve started this project way back in the mid-2000s. As one who’s a sucker for awards shows and predicting them (it’s weird I know), I try to pick my own choices in the main categories. Just a few years ago, I decided to do the techs as well. But it’s mostly focused on the four acting categories, directing, screenplay, ensemble, and Best Picture. This has been a work in progress, as I still catch up on some movies years past their actual release (especially the ones in the mid-2000s and early 2010s). Let it be clear as well that I have so many blindspots in terms of movies that I still haven’t seen (in Lav Diaz’ case for instance, I’ve only seen Batang WestsideNorte, and Mula sa Kung Ano ang Noon) missing almost everything in his filmography (my loss, I understand). Also, the reason why I decided to begin with 2000s is probably because that’s the reasonable year when materials are still searchable and probably the year when I began to sleep late catching up awards shows in RPN 9 as I list them in a yellow paper. LOL. Anyway, let’s begin with my Screenplay picks of the last fifteen years:

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As a recap, here are my winners for the first 15 years:

2000: Armando Lao, “Tuhog
2001: Lav Diaz, “Batang Westside
2002: Lualhati Bautista, “Dekada ’70
2003: Michiko Yamamoto, “Magnifico
2004: Armando Lao, “Minsan Pa
2005: Michiko Yamamoto, “Ang Pagdadalaga ni Maximo Oliveros
2006: Mary Ann Bautista, Jose Javier Reyes, “Kasal, Kasali, Kasalo
2007: Jade Castro, Michiko Yamamoto, Raymond Lee, “Endo
2008: Francis Xavier Pasion, “Jay
2009: Veronica Velasco, Jinky Laurel, “Last Supper #3
2010: Jerrold Tarog, “Senior Year
2011: Alvin Yapan, “Ang Sayaw ng Dalawang Kaliwang Paa
2012: Jun Lana, “Bwakaw
2013: Lav Diaz, Rody Vera, “Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan
2014: Giancarlo Abrahan, “Dagitab

And some other random stats:
MULTIPLE WINNERS:
3: Michiko Yamamoto (Magnifico, Ang Pagdadalaga ni Maximo Oliveros, Endo)
2: Lav Diaz (Batang West Side, Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)
2: Armando Lao (Tuhog, Minsan Pa)

MULTIPLE MENTIONS:
4: Armando Lao (Tuhog, La Vida Rosa, Minsan Pa, Biyaheng Lupa)
3: Raymond Lee (Tanging Yaman, Milan, Endo)
3: Jerrold Tarog (Confessional, Senior Year, Sana Dati)
3: Rody Vera (Nino, Requieme, Norte Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)
3: Michiko Yamamoto (Magnifico, Ang Pagdadalaga ni Maximo Oliveros, Endo)
2: Lav Diaz (Batang West Side, Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)
2: Antoinette Jadaone (Six Degrees of Separation from Lilia Cuntapay, That Thing Called Tadhana)
2: Chris Martinez (100, Here Comes the Bride)
2: Jose Javier Reyes (Minsan May Isang Puso, Kasal Kasali Kasalo)
2: Veronica Velasco (Inang Yaya, Last Supper #3)

What are your favorite local film Screenplay from the last fifteen years? Pipe ’em in below!

 

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10 Best MMFF Movies of the Last 10 Years   Leave a comment

Last week, the Metro Manila Development Authority headed by Francis Tolentino has announced the entries for this year’s Metro Manila Film Festival. And as expected, MMFF staples such as Vice Ganda, Robin Padilla, Vic Sotto, Kris Aquino, and Aiai delas Alas all have entries this year.

Once the festival home of films such as Himala, Burlesk Queen, Karnal, Itanong Mo Sa Buwan, Magic Temple, and Dekada ’70, there has been a paradigm shift in terms of the criteria on how films are chosen the past decade. Commercial appeal has been the primary agenda now and box office as a main factor on which entries will make it.

And while this has elicited a lot of criticisms, particularly the idea of prioritizing box office over “quality” films, the MMFF has still treated us with some notable films quality films over the years. This coming year, entries from Gil Portes, Antoinette Jadaone, Jose Javier Reyes, and Dan Villegas have been chosen while those of Erik Matti’s and Jeffrey Jeturian were in the waitlist categories.

Before I reveal my picks of the ten best MMFF films of the last ten years (New Wave section excluded), here are five that came close from being included:

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“Ulam” from Shake, Rattle, and Roll XV (director: Jerrold Tarog, 2014) – Ulam made good use of every minute we’ve seen on screen to show the horrors and tension of a marital relationship.

“Katas ng Saudi” (director: Jose Javier Reyes, 2007) – Probably the most memorable OFW movies in local cinema depict those of a mother leaving their children behind. Here’s from a father’s perspective of coming home and realizing it isn’t what he expected.

“Pagpag” (director: Frasco Mortiz, 2013) – It’s horror by the numbers, but it tackles such a Filipino ritual one can’t help but to give in to its scares.

“Manila Kingpin: The Asiong Salonga Story” (director: Daryl dela Cruz, 2011) – It got its reputation as the one that started the action comeback, but its behind the scenes director mishap got in the way for  the film to move from being good to being great.

“One More Try” (director: Ruel Bayani, 2012) – Rip-off or not, the film brags of solid performances from its four leads, particularly that of its lead actress Angel Locsin.

And as for the top 10:

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10. “Parola” from Shake, Rattle, and Roll 13 (director: Jerrold Tarog, 2011) – Parola is the perfect throwback to the early heydays of the Shake, Rattle, and Roll franchise, only with better production and technical achievements. Its scares mixes that of the old and the new, giving the type of scares that the audience will definitely bite.

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09. “English Only Please” (director: Dan Villegas, 2014) – It’s easy to dismiss English Only Please from the get go, it’s not from the manufactured Star Cinema factory of kilig, not does it star a tandem that has a solid following. But it has proven that it doesn’t need any of those. It gives the same kilig and “feels” without the need to fall trap to the usual rom-com clichés.

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08. “Blue Moon (director: Joel Lamangan, 2005) – During the last few years when Regal Films was still obsessed with this big star-studded ensembles in family dramas comes Lamangan directing a Palanca-winning screenplay about three generation of family members with the patriarch searching for his one true love. The film is mostly fluff hiding in between the big war backdrop, but its attempt is earnest one can’t help but fall in love with it.

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07. “Lihim ng San Joaquin (director: Richard Somes, 2005) – When Shake, Rattle, and Roll made a comeback in the mid-Aughts, a lot expected to feel the throwback of the early 90s horror franchise. Instead, we got that ridiculous “Poso” episode and an uneven “Aquarium” one. Then comes “Lihim ng San Joaquin”, about a young , newlywed couple transferring to a rural town. This one will keep you on the edge of your seat with its silence.

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06. “Kubot: The Aswang Chronicles (director: Erik Matti, 2014) – Sure, the MMFF has been a commercial venue for the whole family to enjoy, but with Kubot, the follow up to 2012’s Tiktik, Erik Matti proved that a sequel isn’t an alibi to come up with a lackluster addition to a franchise (which most MMFF franchises are guilty of doing). While it doesn’t necessarily have to beat its predecessor, it doesn’t have to be a downgrade as well.

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05. “Boy Golden: Shoot to Kill (director: Chito Rono, 2013) – The best thing about Boy Golden is that it doesn’t want to prove anything. It doesn’t take itself seriously and just wants to have fun. And boy was it a fun movie-watching experience mixing camp and action we haven’t seen in a long time.

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04. “Punerarya” from Shake, Rattle and Roll 12 (director: Jerrold Tarog, 2010) – Hands down, this is one of the best episodes ever in the whole SRR franchise. Jerrold Tarog’s first output stars Carla Abellana as a private tutor to two kids from the neighbor’s funeral parlor. And as secrets were slowly revealed, the tension just escalates further. This one doesn’t get old and is a must watch.

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03. “RPG Metanoia” (director: Luis Suarez, 2010) – Not for lack of trying, the MMFF has welcomed local animation in the festival. Twice, even (the first one was 2008’s “Dayo sa Mundo ng Elemento”). RPG can brag about being the first Pinoy 3D animated film, but more than that achievement, its dedication in tackling a theme highlighting the rich Philippine culture is admirable.

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02. “Kasal, Kasali, Kasalo” (director: Jose Javier Reyes, 2006) – On the outside, Kasal’s biggest achievement is how it managed to be a crowd-pleasing film, yet one that critics will positively respond as well. Digging deeper, it’s really not difficult to fall in love with this film. It touches the topic of a traditional Pinoy family whose value for marriage and relationship is as valuable to the whole family, maybe even more so, than to the actual couple. Obviously, the great ensemble elevated the already strong material further.

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01. “Thy Womb (director: Brillante Mendoza, 2012) – It’s silly when you think about it, that the best film of the festival of the last decade, was just a replacement choice of that year. Shot in the farthest village of Tawi-Tawi, “Thy Womb” wasn’t just the story of a midwife attempt to provide her husband a child, but it also opened us to a culture we aren’t particularly familiar with. I believe this is one of the films that will go down as the best in the history of the festival. Plus, it gave us Nora Aunor’s comeback performance.

So as much as we rant and complain about the MMFF every year, chances are there are one or two entries that will really be worth of our money. This year has the potential to deliver as well.

You can tweet me if you want to talk about this list: @nikowl